Annual/Wellness Exams
annualexamsThe Burlington Veterinary Center is equipped to provide preventative, diagnostic, and therapeutic services to care for your pet's complete health care needs for every state of their life.

The Burlington Veterinary Center Team believes that preventative health care is the best medicine. We recommend Key Diagnostic Laboratory Testing for our patients based on their relative life stages. 
 
There are many important aspects of Key Diagnostic Tests:
-Early disease detection and intervention can dramatically improve the outcome in treating a wide variety of different disease and conditions. 
-It is the innate nature of animals to hide signs of illness. Biochemical changes found in key diagnostic testing often appear long before detectable abnormal physical exam findings. 
-Our pets age more quickly than our human counterparts. Our pets age can age an equivalent of 5-10 years for each human calendar year.
 -Experts in veterinary medicine and our own experiences here at the Burlington Veterinary Center have clearly demonstrated that establishing a pet's laboratory database can not only be useful in discovering abnormalities that were undetected with thorough physical examination, but can also act as baseline test values in the healthy patient that can be referred to in future visits. 
 
Included in the Key Diagnostic Tests is the Heartworm 4DX Test. As of January of 2012 the Burlington Veterinary Center is now screening our canine patients annually for 3 tick-borne (Rickettsial) diseases in conjunction with our annual heartworm testing. BVC’s new Heartworm/Rickettsial combination screening assays for the exposure to three common and potentially deadly rickettsial (tick-transmitted) diseases: Lyme disease (Borreliosis), Anaplasmosis and Ehrlichia canis as well as testing for the presence of adult female heartworms. Borrelia and Anaplasma infections have proven to be highly endemic to this geographic region. 
 

Heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) is a nematode parasite that inhabits the right side of the heart and pulmonary arteries of dogs. Left untreated, heartworm infection leads to heart failure, pneumonia, thrombo-embolic (blood clots/stroke) disease, liver failure, kidney failure and death. The Burlington Veterinary Center follows the recommendations of the American Heartworm Society and the Companion Animal Parasite Council in advising our dog owners to test their dogs annually for heartworm infection and keep their pets on monthly heartworm preventative year round.

 

A positive “+” antibody test as used in Idexx “4DX” test detects the presence of antibodies to the Lyme organism and is consistent with your dog having been successfully transmitted the bacterial organism Borrelia borgderferi that is responsible for causing the various maladies associated with Lyme disease. Fortunately, only 5 – 10% of infected dogs ever become ill from Lyme (Borrelia) exposure. It is important that veterinarians communicate to dog owners that the administration of antibiotics to healthy patients with Lyme exposure has not been shown to provide any benefit in warding off future Lyme associated illness. In addition to needless expense for owners, and antibiotics potentially having their own adverse side effects, unnecessary administration of antibiotics may lead to the development of antibiotic resistance which may further complicate therapy in the true “Lyme-ill” patient. In the absence of any evidence of detectable disease antibiotic treatment is not indicated in the Lyme positive dog. Fortunately, many dogs can successfully eliminate or subdue Lyme (Borrelia) infection on their own. 

A positive “+” antibody test as used in Idexx “4DX” test detects the presence of antibodies to the organism Anaplasma phagocytophilium and is consistent with your dog having been successfully transmitted this bacterial organism from a protracted Deer tick (Ixodes species) attachment. A positive test result does not correlate with illness rather it only indicates exposure to the organism. Many if not most dogs are believed to handle and eliminate the organism without complication. It is important that owners understand that there is no known benefit to medicating the asymptomatic dog for Anaplasma exposure. In addition to needless expense for owners, and antibiotics potentially having their own adverse side effects, unnecessary administration of antibiotics may lead to the development of antibiotic resistance which may further complicate therapy in the true “Anaplasma-ill” patient. Certainly a positive Anaplasma patient reveals tick exposure and veterinarians should be sure dog owners understand the possibility of comorbidity i.e. that other tick transmitted organisms Borrelia (Lyme), Babesia, Ehrlichia, Bartonella, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever associated bacteria may also have infected their pets as many of the ticks that transmit Anaplasma also carry and transmit these organisms. Testing for other Rickettsial exposures especially in the ill patient is often indicated. 

In short, in the absence of any evidence of detectable disease and absent any known benefit antibiotic treatment is not indicated in the Anaplasma positive dog.

A positive “+” antibody test as used in Idexx “4DX” test detects the presence of antibodies to the organism Ehrlichia canis and is consistent with your dog having been successfully transmitted one or more of the different Ehrlichia  bacterial organisms from a protracted tick attachment. Ehrlichia canis is transmitted by Rhipicephalus sanguineus, commonly known as the “brown dog tick”.Ehrlichia related diseases are capable of causing a broad range of clinical signs. A positive test result does not correlate with illness rather it only indicates exposure to the organism. Many if not most dogs are believed to handle and eliminate the organism without complication. It is critically important that owners understand that these organisms can cause fatal illness. Assessing and monitoring complete blood counts with an emphasis on platelet counts is vitally important for veterinarians to detect emerging illness before dogs experience the potentially severe and even fatal consequences of these infections. It is important that owners also understand that there is no known benefit to medicating the asymptomatic dog for Ehrlichia exposure. In addition to needless expense for owners, and antibiotics potentially having their own adverse side effects, unnecessary administration of antibiotics may lead to the development of antibiotic resistance which may further complicate therapy in the true “Ehrlichia-ill” patient. Certainly a positive Ehrlichia patient reveals tick exposure and veterinarians should be sure dog owners understand the possibility of comorbidity i.e. that other tick transmitted organisms Borrelia (Lyme), Babesia, Anaplasma, Bartonella, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever associated bacteria may also have infected their pets as many of the ticks that transmit Ehrlichia also carry and transmit these organisms. Testing for other Rickettsial exposures especially in the ill patient is often indicated.  In short, in the absence of any evidence of detectable disease and absent any known benefit antibiotic treatment is not indicated in the Ehrlichia positive dog. 

Burlington Veterinary Center

 17 Covey Rd. Burlington, CT 06013 / USA  1-860-675-6009

Office hours

  • Monday 8:00 am to 6:00 pm
  • Tuesday 8:00 am to 6:00 pm
  • Wednesday 8:00 am to 4:00 pm
  • Thursday 8:00 am to 6:00 pm
  • Friday 8:00 am to 4:00 pm
  • Saturday 8:00 am to 12:00 pm
  • Sunday Closed

Emergencies

Emergencies during office hours will be seen right away. Please call ahead. After hours please contact either:

Veterinary Emergency Center Canton
860-693-6992
135 Dowd Avenue, Canton, CT 06019
Open: 24/7/365
or
Avon Veterinary Emergency Referral
860.470.7456
9 Avonwood Road Avon, CT 06001
Open Monday – Thursday 5 pm–8 am
Friday 5 pm – Monday 8 am
24 Hours on Holidays